Lesson Name:

Logic of the Lesson

Author, Date

 

The following is a lesson logic for teaching (the major idea or ideas) in (course, topic, or grade level). 

 

A lesson logic is the outline of how you will develop the lesson's main ideas. It does not pay attention to time, meaning that the "lesson" may transcend several class periods. It does not give the level of detail that a lesson plan gives, meaning it might not say how you will organize the classroom, how you will transition from one activity to another, etc. Instead, it focuses on the ideas you will develop, the way you develop them, and why you take the approach you take.

 

This lesson logic provides a structure in which the surrounding conversation unfolds these ideas:[1]

Major ideas of the lesson, listed in a way that summarizes the logic:

1.      

2.      

3.      

Meanings students must have to participate in the lesson:[2]

Things students must understand at the outset, or be reminded of easily, if they are to participate productively in the lesson. This is not the same as things they must be able to do. The meanings they must have are often meanings you must review as a lead-in to your lesson or review at critical moments during your lesson. But they must have experienced these meanings prior to this lesson.

1.      

2.      

3.      

Didactic Objects employed in the lesson and important features of them:

1.      

2.      

 

 

Phases and Steps in the Lesson Logic

Idea/Phase

Step

Action

Reason

 

1.      

 

 

 

2.      

 

 

 

3.      

 

 

 



  Form © 2008 Patrick W. Thompson

[1] The final form of your description of the major ideas that this lesson addresses will likely evolve from your attempts to create the lesson logic for teaching them. You should nevertheless attempt to state them before creating the steps of your lesson logic. In other words, someone reading your lesson logic will read your description of the big ideas before reading your steps for teaching them. But, you likely will have refined your description of major ideas while creating the steps for teaching them.

[2] Your list of “meanings students must have” often will evolve while you write the steps in your lesson logic. Write them as they occur to you, and be alert to when you plan a step that presumes students have a meaning that is essential for them to participate.